Texas


Who are the Uninsured Health Care Counterpoint

What are some facts and who are those Americans with Uninsured Health Care:

(Most figures come from an annual report issued by the United States Census Bureau)

  1. There are 46.3 million (15.4% of population) in 2008
  2. 36-39 million of uninsured (78-85%) are naturalized citizens
  3. 14.8 million uninsured Hispanics (32.1% of Hispanics)
  4. 7.4 million blacks (19.5% of blacks) lack insurance
  5. 8.1 million children (under 18 yrs) are uninsured
  6. 8.0 million young adults (18-24 yrs) are uninsured
  7. 70% uninsured non-citizens live in California, Texas, Florida, New York
  8. 13.5 million uninsured make below $25,000/yr income
  9. 14.5 million uninsured make $25,000-$49,000/yr income
  10. 8.5 million uninsured make $50,000-$75,000/yr income
  11. 9.1 million uninsured make above $75,000/yr income
  12. 20% of uninsured are able but elect not to collect insurance
  13. 25% of uninsured are eligible for public insurance, but elect not
  14. 56% of uninsured need financial assistance
  15. 5 million uninsured are uninsurable because of pre-existing conditions
  16. The per capita spending on 46 million uninsured is about half that of the 253 million insured
  17. 83 million (27.8% of population) is covered by public government insurance

Other interesting articles for consideration:

The number of uninsured Americans is at an all time high.

US Census Bureau News

Uninsured count needs explanation

Uninsured immigrants Burden the Health Care System

 

Click here to see other Counterpoint articles

Wind Turbine Power Counterpoint

 

I have become interested in the use of wind turbine farms that are springing up for producing electrical power. This article will look at some of the present facts.

See Panoramic Photos of an Illinois Wind Turbine Farm located near Paw Paw, Illinois.

 

At the end of 2007, worldwide capacity of wind-powered generators was 94.1 gigawatts or approximately1% of world-wide electricity use. The largest producers account for approximately 19% of electricity production in Denmark, 9% in Spain and Portugal, and 6% in Germany and the Republic of Ireland (2007 data). Globally, wind power generation increased more than fivefold between 2000 and 2007. Wind power available in the atmosphere is much greater than current world energy consumption. The most comprehensive study to date found the potential of wind power on land and near-shore to be equivalent to 54,000 MToE (million tons of oil equivalent) per year, or over five times the world’s current energy use in all forms.

 

Cost per unit of energy produced was estimated in 2006 to be comparable to the cost of new generating capacity in the United States for coal and natural gas: wind cost was estimated at $55.80 per MWh, coal at $53.10/MWh and natural gas at $52.50. In the United States, wind power receives a tax credit for each kilowatt-hour produced; at 1.9 cents per kilowatt-hour in 2006. Without this tax credit there would be little new wind power generation in the US.

 

Advantages

 

  1. Wind power is nearly pollution free.
  2. Wind power is intermittent and unpredictable.
  3. Wind power allows for greater electrical power diversity.
  4. Reduced environmental impact for electrical power.

Disadvantages

 

  1. Electricity from wind remains costlier than that generated from fossil fuels.
  2. Aesthetic and wildlife issues have led to opposition emerging around the country.
  3. Wind farms require wind speed (min 6 m/s) and large tracts of space.
  4. Lack of electrical-grid capacity to carry the power from the isolated places.
  5. Much of the boom in the United States is being driven by foreign power companies with experience developing wind projects.
  6. Wind energy will not reduce US oil dependence.
  7. There are pitfalls in wind energy cost analysis.

 

From the facts, it appears that wind turbine power will be a viable source as long as there is a tax advantage or financial support. Wind energy costs can be cut substantially if a wind project is owned by a utility, and could also be sharply reduced if wind developers could obtain the same financing terms as gas power plant developers.

Of interest are the candidate’s views on technological issues: Energy, Climate change, Space program, skilled worker shortage, and technology.

Some more interesting articles: 

  1. Largest wind turbine.
  2. Wind power info.
  3. Delaware offshore wind farm.
  4. Great Lakes Wind over water.
  5. Wind Power poised for significant growth.
  6. Machine Design Editorial: The Economics of Renewable Energy